SHARE

Because the taste of the deer shouldn’t remind you of the actual deer.

Deer season is well underway across the nation so it’s time to offer our roundup of some of the best deer recipes we’ve found so far on the internet.

We haven’t tried all of these, and a few are cutting edge, so beware. But they all look great and we can’t wait to get started.

Venison Jerky

Field and Stream has a terrific recipe for deer jerky made with Scotch whisky. “The peaty, malty flavors of Scotch make a potent addition to a traditional marinade of soy (for salt) and brown sugar and maple syrup (for sweet),” Jonathan Miles writes.

Here are the ingredients. Miles will walk you through the directions here.

About 2 lb. venison roast
3⁄4 cup Scotch whisky
1⁄2 cup soy sauce
1⁄4 cup brown sugar
2 Tbsp. maple syrup
1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
1 Tbsp. coarsely ground black pepper
1 tsp. liquid smoke (optional)

 

Butterfly Venison

Over at Grand View Outdoors, Bob McNally offers up a venison marinade. “Cook on hot coals, like doing a beef steak. It will flame and you’ll think it’s burning, but it’s not. Takes about 30 minutes for rare big pieces. This is great for guests as there are well-done, medium and rare cuts of meat (as a boned ham has thin and thick portions).”

Sample ingredients are below. Here’s his recipe. “Cook on hot coals, like doing a beef steak. It will flame and you’ll think it’s burning, but it’s not. Takes about 30 minutes for rare big pieces. This is great for guests as there are well-done, medium and rare cuts of meat (as a boned ham has thin and thick portions).”

1 boned deer ham

1 1/2 cups olive oil

1/2 cup Wesson oil

3 tablespoons soy sauce

1 tablespoon Lawry’s Season Salt

1 tablespoon Paprika

1 tablespoon meat tenderizer

4-6 garlic cloves (chopped fine, or through a press)

Juice of 1 whole lemon

 

Does Your Venison Tastes Like Hell?

Having trouble after you’ve found the right recipe? Over at RealTree.com, Will Brantley, gives us “12 Reason’s Why Your Venison Tastes Like Hell.” Some things consistently make venison really tasty,” writes Brantley. “And some things will ruin the flavor, too.”

Here are some of Brantley’s reasons for why your deer went bad, real bad. Check out all of them here:

Failure to Cool Quickly “Internal bacteria rapidly takes over after death, expelling gases and causing the animal to bloat. That’s the first step in decomposition. This process is accelerated in warm weather. Learn how to field dress a deer, and get to it ASAP. Removing those organs is the first step in cooling the animal down.”

Shot the Wrong Deer: “Old bucks are perfectly edible, but rarely the best. Muscles get tougher with use and stringy with age. An old buck that’s spent a full autumn fighting, rubbing, scraping and chasing does will be lean. Expect chewy steaks. Same thing goes for an old doe that’s burned all her summertime calories producing milk to nurse fawns. I usually make hamburger, sausage and jerky out of such animals.”

Dirty Knives and Power Saws: “A deer’s legs are held together just like yours: with ball-and-socket joints and connective tissue. Learn where these are, and you can cut an entire skinned deer apart within minutes with a good pocket knife. Laying into a deer’s legs and spine with a power saw puts bone marrow, bone fragments and whatever mess was on the saw blade into your venison. Would you season your steak with bone fragments and wood shavings? Didn’t think so.”

 Getting Too Fancy: “There’s no big mystery or secret to cooking venison. Treat it as you would treat very lean beef, and you’ll get outstanding results day in and out. We substitute deer burger for beef hamburger in virtually everything—chili, tacos, sloppy Joe’s, burgers on the grill, spaghetti and who knows what else. We never plan on a “wild game night” at the house. We just plan to cook dinner, and that usually means wild game by default.”